What is the definition of electrostatic induction?

Electrostatic induction is a method to create or generate static electricity in a material by bringing an electrically charged object near it. This causes the electrical charges to be redistributed in the material, resulting in one side having an excess of either positive (+) or negative (−) charges.

Considering this, what is the difference between charging by conduction and induction?

Each of these examples involves contact between a charged object and a neutral object. In contrast to induction, where the charged object is brought near but never contacted to the object being charged, conduction charging involves making the physical connection of the charged object to the neutral object.

How is charging by induction carried out?

If a negatively charged object is used to charge a neutral object by induction, then the neutral object will acquire a positive charge. And if a positively charged object is used to charge a neutral object by induction, then the neutral object will acquire a negative charge.

How can an Electroscope be positively charged by induction?

Touch the electroscope and bring a charged rod close. If the charged rod is negative, electrons from the electroscope will flow onto your body. Now remove your hand and then move the charged rod away. The electroscope will be left with a deficit of electrons giving it a positive charge.

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