What is the Calvin cycle and what does it do?

The Calvin Cycle. Plants use energy from the sun in tiny energy factories called chloroplasts. Using chlorophyll in the process of photosynthesis, they convert the sun's energy into storable form in ordered sugar molecules such as glucose.

What is the process of Calvin cycle?

The Calvin cycle has four main steps: carbon fixation, reduction phase, carbohydrate formation, and regeneration phase. Energy to fuel chemical reactions in this sugar-generating process is provided by ATP and NADPH, chemical compounds which contain the energy plants have captured from sunlight.

What takes place in the Calvin cycle?

Unlike the light reactions, which take place in the thylakoid membrane, the reactions of the Calvin cycle take place in the stroma (the inner space of chloroplasts). This illustration shows that ATP and NADPH produced in the light reactions are used in the Calvin cycle to make sugar.

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